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Left Behind

“The old liberal left paid attention to complexity, ambiguity, the gray areas. A sense of complexity induced a measure of doubt, including self-doubt. The new left typically seeks to reduce things to elements such as race, class and gender, in ways that erase ambiguity and doubt. The new left is a factory of certitudes.”

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Everybody–Calm Down

As usual, Peggy Noonan gets it exactly right in her column on November 14 in The Wall Street Journal. Mr. Biden knows what he’s doing, is in control of the transition process, can move that process forward without Presidential Daily Briefings, and must give his Republican Senatorial colleagues running room to back the current president’s nonsense about not having lost the election. In time everyone will come around.

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Party Realignment

We still have no winner yet in the Senate. The Democrats could still gain control if they win both seats in the Georgia runoffs and Biden is president. That’s a lot of ifs in a year that should have been a blue wave if ever there was one. Why did that not happen?

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Democratic Problems

In a pointed op-ed in The Wall Street Journal on November 10, Cenk Uygur, CEO of “The Young Turks” makes the case that the Democratic Party is being led by the conventional wing of that party into election ruin and that it’s time to let the progressives take over. I believe that this is both right and wrong.

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America Lost

Tom Friedman’s op-ed in The New York Times on November 5 puts its finger on what has been so bothersome to me since the election results started to roll in.

The closeness of the result and the fact that a winner had yet to be declared as I wrote this on November 5 says a few things about the state of the nation in 2020.

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In-Coming

I was taking on heavy artillery in my email the morning I posted “I Don’t Recognize My Country.” My conservative readers insist that Trump was good for the country and that Biden is the short route to socialism and widespread chaos. My liberal readers think I was too tough on Biden and that he represents exactly what I said I was looking for in a president. I guess I must have gotten it right if both sides think I got it wrong.

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I Don’t Recognize My Country

      I bought into it years ago. I am an American. Even when I felt like a foreigner, I was always an American. I pledged allegiance to the flag and learned the Star Spangled Banner. I memorized the Preamble to the Constitution and learned my American history. I visited all the monuments in Washington, DC and climbed the Statue of Liberty. I’ve been to Pearl Harbor, Ground Zero, and the Sixth Floor Museum in Dallas. I’m an American.

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Too Close Is Too Close

On the morning after the election, we awake to find—confusion. It’s three days later and we haven’t gotten to clarity yet.

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Normal

In this op-ed in The New York Times, dated September 15 by Aaron E. Carroll sent to me by a blog reader, the author claims that the United States (maybe the world?) won’t get back to normal after the covid-19 crisis even after the advent of an effective, safe vaccine. Carroll claims that masks will still be the fashion statement of the year through 2021 and he backs his statements up with warnings from Tony Fauci. I think he’s wrong, not in his science, but in the outcome.

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What’s Enough?

This is the last blog before Election Day. This year, 2020, has been monumental in so many ways, but only in one that counts. No, it is not that it is a presidential election year or that it’s an Olympic year that got cancelled. It’s all about the virus.

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Don’t Forget Middle America

In a particularly cogent op-ed in The Wall Street Journal on October 19, Jason De Sena Trennart, the chairman of Strategas an investment-strategy, economic and policy research firm, reminds us all why Mr. Trump won the 2016 election and why forgetting why may have consequences this time.

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Up To The Women

What the two editorials indicate is that women, particularly white women—those a plurality of whom voted for Trump in 2016—will need to vote for Biden if the former vice president is to win this election. Furthermore, it is also clear that this is a tipping point election in that the country will go one way if Trump is re-elected and another if Biden wins.

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Best Covid Op-Ed

This piece by John M. Barry of the Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine in The New York Times on October 20 is hands down the best summary of the coronavirus crisis and our response to it that I have read. Allow me to summarize.

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No Drama Biden

Is the 2020 presidential race mirroring the selection process for a new MD Anderson president of a few years ago? I think so.

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Crazy

In this Peggy Noonan column from The Wall Street Journal on October 17, there is but one conclusion to be drawn. The country has gone nuts, or at least its elected representatives have.

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Silly Senate Dance

It does not state anywhere in the Constitution that the Senate has to hold hearings on presidential nominees to the federal judiciary. Rather it is with the Senate’s “advice and consent” that these presidential appointments take effect. It is the Senate that has decided to hold hearings on nominees to the executive and judicial branches and take a vote on confirmation.

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